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We know the college admission process can be a little overwhelming. We're here to help.

If you have a specific question, it’s likely someone else did too. For quick reference, we’ve compiled the answers to our Frequently Asked Questions. Please select your topic below.

Frequently Asked Questions

What if what I would like to submit does not exactly match the guidelines laid out by the department?

We encourage applicants to adhere as closely to the guidelines as possible, as that is what our faculty finds to be most helpful. However, we encourage you to submit the works that best highlight your talents. Most categories have a “miscellaneous” or “other” option if your work or works do not fall neatly into one subcategory.

What do I do if I receive a 500 error while trying to upload my files?

The name of your files may be too long or contain invalid characters.  Please try editing your file names and try again.

I tried to preview and submit my art form but none of my materials were saved. What should I do?

After you choose the files that you would like to submit, make sure you click the Upload button.  The names of files that have been successfully uploaded will be moved to the empty space above the “Select the type of file(s)” list.

I tried to upload my documents and received an invalid file type error; what do I do?

Please check to make sure that you have selected the appropriate file type from the “Select the type of file(s)” drop down menu.  This menu is positioned in the Art Supplement File section.

Is there a preferred format to the files?

No. We accept many different formats including but not limited to: .mp3, .mp4, video, .jpeg, etc.

What if my file size exceeds the maximum limit?

We would encourage you to consider posting the file on a hosting site and sharing the unique link.

How can I submit a letter of recommendation for my arts form?

Letters of recommendation may be uploaded through the Online Optional Arts Form. Recommenders may also email, mail or fax their letters directly to the admission office. 

May I submit an introduction video instead of a CV?

We ask that you adhere as closely as possible to the requirements for the arts supplement. As such, we would prefer a CV. If you choose to upload an introduction video in lieu of a CV, we cannot guarantee it will be reviewed.

What if what I would like to submit does not exactly match the guidelines laid out by the department for a form?

We encourage applicants to adhere as closely to the guidelines as possible, as that is what our faculty finds to be most helpful. However, we encourage you to submit the works that best highlight your talents. Most categories have a “miscellaneous” or “other” option if your work or works do not fall neatly into one subcategory.

How may I submit multiple Optional Arts Forms?

Remember: you may not submit multiple Arts Forms in the same category. To submit multiple arts forms in different categories, upload your first category. You may then select from the button below “Add New Arts Form” to upload a second (or third) form.

May I submit multiple Optional Arts Forms?

You may submit multiple Arts Forms as long as they are in different categories and/or subcategories. For example, you can submit forms for music in both voice and violin, but you may not submit two voice forms. 

Can I submit an Arts Form before I submit my application for admission?

You must submit an application for admission before you can use your Admission Portal login information to access the Online Optional Arts Form.

How can I log in to the online Optional Arts Form?

After applicants have submitted an application to Princeton University, they can use the same login information from the Princeton Applicant Portal to log into the Online Optional Arts Form.  

My school has a dual-enrollment program with a local college and I have completed college courses through that program. Can I earn credit for those courses?

Although students are not eligible for credit for college courses taken through a dual-enrollment program, students may earn advanced placement for high scores on departmental placement tests offered by some Princeton departments. Consult the Reference Table for AP Credit.

Can I earn credit for courses taken at another college or university?

Students are not eligible for credit for college courses taken before they enter Princeton. Many academic departments at Princeton offer advanced placement to students who have done well on an approved standardized exam (AP, IB, A-Level). Some departments may award advanced placement for a high score on departmental placement tests. Consult the Reference Table for AP Credit.

When will I know how much AP credit I will receive?

At the beginning of the fall term of their freshman year, students receive a report of all the AP units they have been granted. Later in the term, they receive a second report reflecting any scores that have since been received.

How are AP credits applied at Princeton?

Students can use AP credits to enter upper-level courses or to fulfill the foreign language requirement. In a few cases, students who have earned a large number of AP credits use them to graduate early through advanced standing. AP credits may not be used to fulfill the writing requirement, reduce students’ course load in a given term or fulfill the distribution requirements. To see how your test scores may translate into advanced placement at Princeton, consult the Reference Table for AP Credit.

What tests do I need to take to earn advanced placement?

When determining advanced placement, we typically use one or more of the following: 1) AP tests 2) International Baccalaureate (IB) higher level exams 3) British A-Level exams 4) SAT subject tests placement tests offered by some academic departments. For more information about required tests and minimum scores, consult the Reference Table for AP Credit.

How can I get to Philadelphia from campus?

Princeton is located between New York and Philadelphia, and is easy to reach by public transportation or by car. To read more about travel options, please visit our Getting to Campus site.

How can I get to New York from campus?

Princeton is located between New York and Philadelphia, and is easy to reach by public transportation or by car. To read more about travel options, please visit our Getting to Campus site.

What are some other points of interest in the Princeton area?

The Princeton area, which has a population of approximately 30,000 residents, has tree-lined streets, speciality shops, restaurants, parks, and a friendly and safe atmosphere. Some local attractions include the Princeton Battlefield State Park, Princeton University Art Museum, Palmer Square, Princeton Cemetery, Drumthwacket (the governor's residence), Albert Einstein’s home, Morven Museum and Garden, and Princeton Record Exchange.  Farmlands, the Pine Barrens, the Jersey shore, the Appalachian Trail and even ski slopes can be visited without leaving New Jersey. Learn more. 

Where are the most conveniently located public restrooms?

Restrooms are available on the 2nd floor of Clio Hall, on multiple levels of the Frist Campus Center, and in the basement of Nassau Hall.

What should I do if there is an emergency on campus?

If there is an emergency while you are visiting campus, please remain calm.  If necessary, use your cell phone or the nearest blue light phone to call 911 or the Department of Public Safety (DPS) emergency number, which is (609) 258-3333.  Our professional campus patrol officers, security officers, dispatchers and fire officials provide 24/7 year round safety services and emergency response to the campus. The campus is equipped with loudspeakers so that emergency services can broadcast instructions if necessary.  

Are the tours & information sessions accessible?

Yes. We do our best to make accommodations for any guests who may require ADA accessible spaces. In order to ensure we make accommodations, please register in advance for our information sessions and tours, and detail your specific requests.

Will I be able to see the inside of a dorm on my tour?

No. For the safety of our current students, and because no single dorm is representative of the many housing options available at Princeton, the campus tour does not showcase a dorm room.  

What happens if it is raining during the tour?

The campus tour will occur rain or shine. If there is inclement weather or dangerous conditions, the tour guide will speak about Princeton from an indoor location.  

Can I schedule a meeting with a professor?

Our office does not arrange meetings with professors. We encourage students to sit in on classes during their visits to campus, but due to the tightness of the academic calendar, we cannot help make any arrangements between prospective students and faculty members.

Can I schedule a meeting with a varsity coach?

Though the admission office makes all final decisions for our student athletes, prospective athletes should communicate directly with Princeton Athletics. Please review the recruiting guidelines and information before you communicate directly with any coaches.

What hotels are in the area?

The greater Princeton area has a wide variety of hotel, motel, inn, and bed and breakfast accommodations. A small number of inns are within walking distance of the University, with most a short drive away. As a service to the community, the Purchasing Department has negotiated special rates for University employees and campus visitors who stay at preferred hotels.

Do you have any recommendations for lunch?

The Princeton area has restaurants for every taste and budget. Local publications provide information and reviews. Please note that restaurants can change or close without notice; always telephone to confirm listed information.  Resources include: Princeton Online, NJ.com dining section, and Shop Princeton Dining.

May I attend a class?

When you check in for your admission information session or campus tour, the admission office staff member at the welcome desk in Clio Hall can provide you with a list of available classes to attend.  Please note that classes are not available on weekends, over the summer, or during holiday and school breaks.  

Where should I park?

Visitors to the undergraduate or graduate admission office may park in Lot 23, which is located near the south end of campus, or in Lot 21, near Jadwin Gym. A free campus shuttle, TigerTransit, operates frequently from Lot 23 during weekdays from early morning to early evening. If you are planning to visit for more than one day, you will need to obtain a permit from the Transportation & Parking Services, in the New South building, floor A, across from West Garage.

Does Princeton track demonstrated interest?

No. We do not track demonstrated interest.  

Do I need to register before my visit?

We encourage but do not require that you register for groups of fewer than 10 people. For groups of 10 or more, reservations must be made at least four weeks in advance of the requested visit date. Learn more. 

How do I arrange to have my application fee waived?

All QuestBridge Finalists automatically qualify for a fee waiver. To request a waiver in the Common Application or the Universal College Application, select “QuestBridge” in response to “Do you intend to use one of these school-specific fee waivers?” You do not need to submit additional paperwork. If you were not named a QuestBridge Finalist and are applying to us through the general process, your college or guidance counselor must approve your fee waiver request online or submit your fee waiver form by mail or fax.

I am not a U.S. citizen. May I apply to Princeton through the College Match program?

Yes. All students, regardless of citizenship status, may apply to Princeton for the College Match.

Do I need to have an interview? How can I schedule one?

Interviews at Princeton are recommended but not required and are conducted by alumni volunteers. You do not need to contact us to arrange an interview. It is unlikely that College Match applicants will be interviewed in November. If you are not matched, and if there are enough volunteers in your area, you will be contacted for an interview in the Regular Decision process.

How do I find out whether I match with Princeton?

College Match applicants will learn if they matched with an institution on Dec. 1. You will receive an email from QuestBridge. Students who match with Princeton will receive a follow-up email from Princeton. Non-matched students will not receive notification from Princeton. We will not be able to release decisions by phone. Please communicate directly with QuestBridge to find out if you matched with a school.

If I’m a QuestBridge Finalist, but don’t match with Princeton, what are my application options?

If you ranked Princeton but didn’t match with Princeton, you will automatically be considered for Regular Decision unless you withdraw your application. If you match with a binding school, your application will not be considered in Regular Decision.

If I apply through the QuestBridge College Match program, but I’m not named a Finalist, what are my application options?

All students who submitted the required materials but did not matched with Princeton or a binding institution will automatically be considered in our Regular Decision process. These students will be notified of our decisions along with all other Regular Decision applicants. Princeton will make decisions available around April 1.

Are my chances of getting into Princeton different depending on how I apply?

No. We apply the same rigorous selection criteria in the College Match process as we do in Single Choice Early Action or Regular Decision.

What happens to my potential financial aid award if I do not match with Princeton in the College Match process, but I'm admitted later in the Regular Decision process?

Students admitted in the Match process and students admitted Regular Decision receive the same financial aid packages. Princeton has a remarkable financial aid program. We are committed to need-based financial aid and fulfilling 100 percent of a student's demonstrated need.

How many students will be matched through Questbridge with Princeton?

We don't have a set number we plan to admit and much depends on the applicant pool itself. In the past, we have admitted a small number of students through College Match with the majority of QuestBridge admits coming in Regular Decision.

Do you offer a fly-in program or a special visit program for QuestBridge students?

Yes, we offer a fly-in program for all admitted students in April. However, we do not offer a fall visitation program, nor do we host overnight visits for prospective students. If students are able, they are welcome to visit the campus for a free information session and tour. Princeton does not track demonstrated interest so students are not penalized in the admission process if they are unable to visit campus. Click here for tour and information session schedules.

How can I contact QuestBridge directly?

QuestBridge can be reached at 1-888-275-2054 or 1-650-331-3280, or via email at questions@questbridge.org. Questions about the status of your QuestBridge application and the College Match process should be directed to QuestBridge.

I am a QuestBridge Finalist and ranked Princeton as one of my college choices. What additional application materials do I have to submit to Princeton to complete my application for the match? When do I need to submit those materials?

Even though your QuestBridge application will be forwarded to us, we still require you to fill out the online Common Application and Princeton Supplement or the Universal College Application with the Princeton Supplement. We also require you to submit additional pieces, as detailed here. All documents must be submitted directly to Princeton’s admission office by Nov. 1. The Princeton Financial Aid Application is also due Nov. 1.

What if my parents are not required to file a federal income tax return?

If your parents are unemployed and filed taxes, they should submit their most recent tax return. If your parents did not file a return, you should submit all documentation of that year’s income, along with a parent non-filer statement, which can be found on the Additional Aid Application Requirements page.

When will I find out if I am a Finalist?

QuestBridge will notify applicants of their status as Finalists or Non-Finalists on October 20.

If I am a Finalist but did not list Princeton as a match institution, may I still apply to Princeton?

Yes, you may still apply to Princeton through Regular Decision. All application materials must be submitted by January 1. Please refer to our application requirements for more information.

What is the QuestBridge National College Match Program?

The QuestBridge National College Match helps outstanding low-income high school seniors gain admission and full four-year scholarships to some of the nation's most selective colleges. Princeton has been a proud QuestBridge partner for many years now and every year, we admit a small number of students through College Match with the majority of QuestBridge admits coming in Regular Decision.

How does applying to Princeton through QuestBridge differ from applying to other QuestBridge partner colleges?

Unlike many QuestBridge partner colleges, Princeton has a nonbinding match. If you apply to Princeton through QuestBridge, you may still apply to other schools as a Regular Decision applicant. Students have until May 1 to respond to their offer of admission.

In addition to the QuestBridge application essays and teacher recommendations, do I need to write new essays and get two more Teacher Evaluations to be considered in either the National College Match or regular decision pool at Princeton?

No. It is perfectly fine for you to reuse your QuestBridge essays on the Common Application or the Universal College Application, and the Princeton Supplement. You may also tell your recommenders that unless they have additional information they would like to include about your candidacy, they can reuse the letters they submitted to QuestBridge.

How many years do you need to be in an English-medium school to be exempt from an English Proficiency Test?

Students must be an in English-medium school for at least three of the four years of high school to be exempt from an English Proficiency Test.

Do I need to take an English Proficiency Test if I am in an English-medium school or English is my first language?

No. If English is your first language or your language of instruction, you do not need to submit an English Proficiency Test.

How far in advance should I complete my testing?

If you are applying Single Choice Early Action, we encourage applicants attending schools outside the United States or Canada to complete their required standardized testing by the October test date, if possible. If you are applying Regular Decision, we encourage you to complete standardized testing by the December test date if possible.  In our experience, scores from the January test date for testers outside the United States do not always reach us in time. However, if January is the only time you can take the test, please sit for the test in January and have your scores reported to us by the testing agency.

If I sit for GCE A-levels or other international credentials, must I submit SAT or ACT scores?

Yes. Though students attending secondary school outside of the United States may be unfamiliar with the SAT or ACT, all applicants must submit testing for the SAT (with essay) or ACT (with writing) and we recommend, but do not require, two SAT Subject Tests. You may read more about our testing policy here.

What if I cannot take the SAT or ACT in my country?

If the SAT tests are not offered in your country, we will consider your application without SAT results. However, we will have less information to consider when evaluating your application than we will have for applicants who are able to take the required tests. In some countries where the SAT is not offered, the ACT is available. If you cannot take the SAT, but the ACT is available, please take the ACT plus writing.

What if English is not my first language?

If English is not the primary language spoken in your home and you attend a school where English is not the language of instruction, you must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), the International English Language Testing System Academic (IELTS Academic) or the Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE Academic).

Does Princeton consider legal immigration status in the admissions process?

No. All students are considered in the same pool for admission to the incoming class regardless of citizenship status. While being undocumented or DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) may present challenges for students wishing to travel or work on campus, immigration status does not impact our reading of an application. The University’s generous need-based financial aid program applies equally to all applicants. If admitted, undocumented students can be confident that their full financial need, as determined by the financial aid office, will be met. We encourage undocumented students to consult with the Office of Admission and the Office of Financial Aid if they have any questions about our process.

What should students know about visas?

After international students are admitted and matriculated to Princeton, the Davis International Center will provide additional information about applying for a student visa.

Are there quotas for international applicants?

No. The admission office does not use quotas of any kind.

Are international students eligible for application fee waivers?

Yes. You may request a fee waiver if you are applying for financial aid and the cost of applying to Princeton represents a financial hardship for your family. Please note that applying for a fee waiver will not disadvantage your application in any way. To request a waiver, select the fee waiver option in the Common Application or the Universal College Application. Your college or guidance counselor must approve your fee waiver request online or submit your fee waiver form by mail or fax.

Are international students eligible for financial aid?

Yes. Our policy of meeting financial need in full for admitted students applies to all admitted students, regardless of citizenship.

Are the admission officers familiar with the educational systems of other countries?

Yes, we are familiar with the educational systems and academic credentials of most countries around the world. You are welcome to provide additional information about the educational system in your country.

What if I do not have a college counselor at my school?

If your school does not have an adviser for students applying to university, please ask a school official — such as a principal, vice principal or dean — to complete your School Report available on the Common Application or the Universal College Application.

Do my recommendations have to be written in English?

If the person you ask to complete a teacher recommendation or School Report is not comfortable writing in English, he or she may complete the forms in another language. However, you will need to have the forms officially translated before they are submitted to the Admission Office.

Are there special admission requirements for students applying from abroad?

If English is not the primary language spoken in your home and you attend a school where English is not the language of instruction, you must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), the International English Language Testing System Academic (IELTS Academic) or the Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE Academic), in addition to the SAT Reasoning (or ACT with Writing, where offerred). SAT Subject Tests are recommended but not required. Otherwise, there are no additional admission requirements for international students or U.S. citizens attending high schools abroad.

Are applications from non-US citizens treated differently in the admission process?

No. We consider all applications in the same way, regardless of citizenship or high school location. We also make no distinctions between international and domestic students when considering financial need.

If I do not apply for aid my first year and my family circumstances change later, can I request aid after my first year?

Yes. Students can apply for aid at any point during their time at Princeton. An explanation of the change in circumstances may be required.

Do I have to maintain a minimum GPA to remain eligible for financial aid?

There is no minimum GPA requirement to remain on financial aid, but students must continue to maintain satisfactory academic progress.

Will I receive the same amount of financial aid every year?

It is our policy to meet every student’s full demonstrated need each year. Award amounts may vary from year to year, based on changes in a family's financial circumstances and Princeton's cost of attendance.

Do I need to reapply for financial aid each year?

For each year of attendance at Princeton, students must submit a new financial aid application. The application is evaluated according to the same need-based guidelines that were in effect when the student was admitted.

Is it true that eating clubs for juniors and seniors are too expensive for aid students to join?

The meal allowance included in the aid packages of juniors and seniors is based on the approximate average cost of an eating club board plan. This policy provides access to a variety of dining options for all aid students, including the eating clubs.

Can I use financial aid to study abroad?

Aid students who receive approval from the Office of International Programs for a semester or year abroad will be eligible for funding based on the cost of the program and amount of their family contribution. Princeton sponsored summer programs are not included since they have their own funds to support student costs.

What does it cost to attend Princeton for a year?

The cost of attendance at Princeton includes tuition, room, board, books and personal expenses. Review the most current cost of attendance.

What if I win an outside scholarship?

Outside scholarships from private sources are used to reduce the campus job and summer savings portions of the aid package. Once the earnings amounts are fully replaced, the Princeton grant is reduced to make room for the remaining scholarship in the award. Students can then use the amount of reduced scholarship toward the one-time purchase of a personal computer up to a pre-set amount by the financial aid office. Learn more about how outside scholarships impact the financial aid award in the Undergraduate Financial Aid Information and Application Instructions, available on the Apply for Financial Aid page.

What is the Federal Work-Study Program (FWSP)?

Federal Work-Study is a form of federal aid which pays student wages.

Is it easy to find a student job on or near campus?

Our Student Employment site is continuously updated with available jobs, making it easy for students to find employment opportunities both on and off campus.

If my aid award includes a campus job, how many hours per week will I work?

We typically expect first-year students to work 9 hours per week, which allows them ample time for studies and extracurricular activities.

If I qualify for aid, how much assistance will I receive?

At Princeton, we are committed to meeting 100 percent of the calculated need of each aid applicant based on an individual evaluation by a financial aid counselor. We make this determination using the information you provide on your financial aid application. Learn more about aid awards in the Undergraduate Financial Aid Information and Application Instructions, which accessible through the Apply for Financial Aid page. You can also use the Princeton Financial Aid Estimator to see how much aid might be offered based on your particular situation.

For students who borrow, what is the average debt at graduation?

For students who choose to borrow, the average total indebtedness is about $8,500.

Does the “no loan” policy mean I would not be allowed to borrow if I wanted to take out a student loan?

Loans are available, and some students request an optional education loan to replace a shortfall in the expected student earnings (term-time job or summer employment) or cover expenses not included in the standard student budget. Learn more about financing options.

Will I need to take out loans?

More than 15 years ago, Princeton eliminated student loans from financial aid awards, replacing them with grants. Since then, no Princeton student has been required to borrow as part of a basic aid package. 84% of recent Princeton seniors graduated debt free.

What kinds of funds will be included in my aid award?

If you receive financial aid, your award will normally include a Princeton grant and a campus job, as well as any outside scholarships you earn. More information about these types of aid is available in the Undergraduate Financial Aid Information and Application Instructions, which can be found on Apply for Financial Aid.

When will I know if I will receive financial aid?

If you are admitted to Princeton and have applied for aid, you will receive a financial aid award along with your offer of admission.

Can I send my tax returns directly to you?

Yes. You will be asked to upload your parents’ tax return, or non-filer information, after you submit the Princeton Financial Aid Application (PFAA).  

What if my parents are unemployed or did not file a tax return?

If your parents are unemployed and filed taxes, they should submit their most recent tax return. If your parents did not file a return, you should submit all documentation of that year’s income, along with a parent non-filer statement. Please visit Additional Aid Application Requirements to download the non-filer statement.

What if my country doesn’t have a tax return?

You should submit all documentation confirming income. Common documents include year-end wage statements and a letter from each employer stating annual income.

Do I need to supply my parents’ financial information if I am a self-supporting student?

When awarding aid, we require parental financial information for all students, with very few exceptions.

My parents are separated or divorced. Do they both need to submit financial information for my aid application?

Yes. Princeton requires both parents to provide financial information in most cases. Please review the Additional Aid Application Requirements for more information. 

Will applying for aid hurt my chance of being admitted to Princeton?

No. There is no disadvantage whatsoever in the admission process for financial aid applicants. Princeton has a need-blind admission policy, ensuring equality of opportunity for students who cannot afford the full cost of attendance. This policy covers all admission applicants, including international students. Learn more about how our aid program works.

How will I know that the FAFSA has been submitted correctly?

You can check the status of your FAFSA online. You should allow one week for processing an online signature, and three weeks for processing a paper signature page.

If I’m a Canadian citizen, do I have to file a FAFSA?

No. Only U.S. Citizens and Permanent Residents can file a FAFSA.

What should I do if I make a mistake on the FAFSA?

If you make a mistake on the FAFSA, you can log back into the FAFSA portal with your FSA ID and password and submit a correction.

What is Princeton’s Federal School Code for the FAFSA?

Princeton’s Federal School Code for the FAFSA is 002627.

Do my documents have to be in English?

Yes. All documents must be officially translated into English for us to review them.

Can I email you my financial aid documents?

After you submit the Princeton Financial Aid Application (PFAA), you will be able to upload the required documents.  If you have supplemental information to send, you should use our secure fax number (609-258-0336) or postal mail. Visit Contact Us for our postal address. 

How and when do I apply for financial aid?

You should apply for financial aid by Feb. 1 of the year you plan to enter college, or you may submit your application by Nov. 1 if you are applying for Early Action. To learn more, please visit Apply for Financial Aid.

Do you give scholarships for academic merit, special talents, or athletic ability?

No. All financial aid awards are based solely on need. Learn more about how Princeton's aid program works.

Are undocumented students eligible for financial aid?

Yes. Undocumented students, including students who have received deferred action under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals process, should apply for financial aid as international students by completing the Princeton Financial Aid Application.  The FAFSA is not required.  Princeton is one of only five schools nationwide that doesn't limit the financial aid available, regardless of citizenship status. Admission is offered to students regardless of their ability to pay, and the full need of every admitted undocumented student is met just as it is for U.S. citizens and permanent residents. While undocumented students are ineligible for federal financial aid, students can still receive aid from Princeton.  

 

Are international students eligible for financial aid?

Yes. Princeton is one of only five schools nationwide that does not limit the financial aid available to international students. Admission is offered to students regardless of their ability to pay, and the full need of every admitted international student is met just as it is for U.S. students.

Before I apply, can I get a sense of whether I might qualify for aid?

Yes. Just enter your financial information into the Princeton Financial Aid Estimator to get an estimate of how much aid you may be qualified to receive. The Princeton Financial Aid Estimator is completely confidential and in no way affects your application for admission or financial aid.

How do you decide who gets financial aid?

Financial aid is awarded based on need only. We use the information you supply on your financial aid application and supporting documents to determine how much support we will provide.

Does Princeton provide specific resources for undocumented students?

Princeton supports all of its students, financially and otherwise, regardless of citizenship. The Princeton DREAM team is a student-run and community-based immigrant rights advocacy group that runs through the Pace Center for Civic Engagement. They are especially knowledgeable about the experience of undocumented students on campus.

What sort of study abroad programs are available?

Our Office of International Programs hosts a wide range of opportunities year-round. You may study abroad for a semester or a school year, participate in international internships in approximately 60 countries, or participate in one of our Global Seminars. You may also join the Bridge Year Program, a tuition-free service gap year, in which you delay your first academic year to engage in service abroad.

Are there research opportunities for undergraduates?

All students conduct independent research in their home department. This culminates in the senior thesis, where each student works one-on-one with a faculty mentor. Some students conduct their research in the library or the lab. Others travel to do field research or undertake a creative project such as a novel or a series of paintings. To get a better sense of the tremendous resources provided for undergraduate research, please visit the Office of Undergraduate Research.

Does Princeton provide services if I have a disability?

Yes. The Office of Disability Services (ODS) offers a range of services that help ensure equal access to our curricular and co-curricular opportunities for students with disabilities. ODS will meet with each student individually and assess their needs. Accessible housing and transportation is also available. Learn more about ODS.

What advising and support services are available?

Academic and other advising resources are integrated into Princeton’s residential framework. Students are assigned a faculty academic adviser before arriving on campus in the fall of their first year, and each residential college has faculty fellows who take part in various components of residential college life. Each residential college also has a network of deans and directors who ensure that our students thrive both academically and personally. Beyond the residential colleges, there are numerous offices on campus that offer advising of all kinds. The Office of Career Services offers career counseling. If you need help with any part of the writing process, our Writing Center will provide a free, one-on-one consultation with one of their trained Writing Fellows. University Health Services (UHS) provides comprehensive medical, health, and wellness services to our students. The Undergraduate Financial Aid Office will help with any financial aid issues and the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning helps our students become more powerful, productive and independent learners. This is just a small sampling of all the resources Princeton has to offer.   

What are Princeton reunions?

Every year, Princeton reunions weekend attracts almost 25,000 alumni, family and friends. Alumni come back to reconnect with old friends and meet new ones, engage intellectually with faculty panels, participate in community service projects, and enjoy great music. The style, scope, and fanfare of this yearly event is uniquely Princeton.

How successful are Princeton students in gaining admission to graduate school or finding employment after graduation?

Our students go on to do extraordinarily well when pursuing graduate  or professional schools or employment after graduation. For the class of 2014, 90 percent of students achieved their post-graduation goals within six months of graduation. The Office of Career Services helps all students define a unique career and life vision, and then helps connect students with the resources and people that will enable them to make their visions a reality.

What is Princeton’s graduation rate?

Princeton’s six-year graduation rate is normally 96 percent, ranking us among the highest at American colleges and universities.

What extracurricular opportunities are available?

There are more than 300 student-run organizations at Princeton, ranging from publications, dance, media, music, theater, service, religious organizations, and more. For the full list, visit the current list of student organizations on campus.

Will Campus Dining meet my dietary restrictions?

There are food options for all types of interests and dietary restrictions. If you have a food allergy, there are signs posted on all of the menu items indicating what the food may contain (gluten, nuts, etc.). The Center for Jewish Life offers kosher meals for the entire campus community, and all residential college dining halls offer halal dining options for students.

Where will I take my meals?

First-year students and sophomores live and eat in dining facilities within their residential colleges. Juniors and seniors can take meals at the colleges, eating clubs, student food cooperatives, and other locations. Any student may eat kosher meals at the Center for Jewish Life (CJL) or have kosher meals delivered to any other campus dining hall. All residential college dining halls offer halal dining options for students.

What will my room look like?

There are various configurations for group and individual living. The University provides each resident with a desk, chair, bookcase, dresser, and bed.

Must I live on campus?

All first-year students and sophomores are required to live in one of Princeton’s six residential colleges. First-years are assigned randomly to a residential college and to a room and roommates by the residential college staff and the Housing office. For sophomore year, students select their own rooming groups and choose rooms in their residential college through a lottery. Juniors and seniors may live off campus if they wish, although houses and apartments in town are in short supply and rents are high.

Is housing guaranteed on campus?

Yes. On-campus housing is guaranteed all four years.

What security measures are in place at Princeton?

The safety and security of all Princeton University faculty, staff, students, and visitors is important to the Department of Public Safety (DPS). Our professional campus patrol officers, security officers, dispatchers and fire officials provide 24/7 year round safety services and emergency response to the campus. DPS provides many services that address the needs of faculty and staff including but not limited to: lockout services, victim services information, building access and event security, campus vehicle certification, RAD self-defense classes, and more.

How can I do independent research?

Our curriculum encourages students to explore many disciplines and to develop a deep understanding in one area of concentration. Whether they are in the A.B. degree program or the B.S.E. program, during the junior and senior years all students conduct independent research in their home department. This culminates in the senior thesis, where each student works one-on-one with a faculty mentor. Some students conduct their research in the library or the lab. Others travel to do field research or undertake a creative project such as a novel or a series of paintings.

What is a “liberal arts” education?

Princeton is a major research institution with the heart and soul of a liberal arts college. In this tradition, our faculty members encourage and challenge every student to explore the many academic opportunities available before settling on a concentration (major). Even after selecting a concentration, students may further chart their academic course in other areas of study, earning certificates in interdepartmental programs. Students also benefit from the interdisciplinary connections at the core of the Princeton curriculum.

How many courses does Princeton offer?

In the fall of 2016, 1275 courses were offered to Princeton students. Note that this number includes graduate courses, which are open to qualified undergraduates with departmental permission.  Please visit our complete course catalog here.

How do I register for courses?

Before you get to campus, you will receive more information about registering for courses. You will be assigned an academic adviser before you step foot on campus, and you will meet with that faculty member during your first days here to go over your course selection.

Are there required first-year classes?

Princeton requires all first-year students to take a writing seminar, either during the fall or spring semester of their first year. However, you may select the topic of the course based on your interests.  Otherwise, you may enroll in any Princeton courses in which you are interested and for which you are prepared with the appropriate pre-requisites if applicable.  

How easy is it to change my concentration?

More than 70 percent of our undergraduates are majoring in fields different from those they indicated when they applied. Our engineering students declare their concentrations at the end of their first year, and all other students declare their concentrations at the end of sophomore year. Any changes are made in consultation with your assigned faculty academic adviser.

May I “double major” at Princeton?

No. Princeton does not offer double/triple majors or dual-degree programs.

Is it possible to get to know my professors?

Absolutely. Princeton professors are easily accessible and happy to chat with students during weekly open office hours or during individual meetings with students. Our professors also take meals in Princeton’s residential dining halls and participate in other programs and special events.

How large are classes?

Approximately 70 percent of classes have fewer than 20 students, and only four  percent  of classes have more than 100 students.

What percentage of faculty members teach undergraduates?

All faculty members are expected to teach, as well as engage in research. All lecture courses and seminars are led by tenure-track professors, visiting faculty members, or lecturers with a Ph.D., but never by graduate students. Faculty members work most closely with undergraduates in the supervision of junior-year independent work and senior theses.

Do I need to communicate directly with the admission staff member who read my file about my deferral?

No. Our decisions are made by a committee of admission officers, and no single individual is responsible for shaping the outcome of an application. We ask that you update us through the General Portal with significant changes since you initially applied, but it is unnecessary to reach out to a particular individual.

If I was deferred, what can I do to improve my chances of admission?

If you submitted all of the required components of your application, we have everything we need for consideration. If you have a significant update, you may add the new information to your file through the applicant portal or by email to uaoffice@princeton.edu.

If I was deferred, is there still a chance that I can be admitted?

Yes. If you are deferred, your application will automatically be rolled over into our regular decision process and considered again in the context of that pool. In recent years, a small number of applicants who were deferred have been subsequently admitted during the regular decision process.  

Why was my application deferred?

Many strong applicants are deferred and reconsidered in context of the regular decision pool, with the additional information provided by mid-year grades. There is no advantage to apply early action to Princeton and competition for early admission to Princeton is especially rigorous.

If I applied under Early Action but I would like to be considered under Regular Decision, can I change my application? What about vice versa?

Please send us an email requesting the change. If possible, we will make the change and send you a confirmation. You do not need to submit a new application; your submitted materials will simply be reviewed on a different time-table.

If I am applying early, do I need to submit first quarter and trimester grades from my senior year in high school?

Yes, if possible, please ask your college counselor to submit any senior grades if your high school has them available.

Can I submit supplementary materials including art supplements with my early action application?

If you are very interested in architecture, creative writing, dance, music, theater or visual arts, we welcome your Optional Arts online submission of your portfolio. If you are unable to submit the form online, you may use a paper Optional Arts Form. For a list of acceptable file formats and submission types please visit our Optional Arts Form page.

Will alumni be available to interview me if I apply for early action?

In most cases, alumni will be available to interview early action applicants. If an interview cannot be scheduled for logistical reasons, you will not be at a disadvantage; alumni interviews are an optional piece of Princeton’s application process.

May I apply to another college under its Regular Decision plan before I receive Princeton’s decision on my Single-Choice Early Action decision?

Yes. You may apply in the fall to any institution under its Regular Decision program.

If I apply Single-Choice Early Action to Princeton, may I apply to another private college’s early action program (restrictive or not)?

No. If you apply Single-Choice Early Action to Princeton, you may not apply early to another private college at the same time — regardless of whether that program is restrictive or not.  

If I apply Single-Choice Early Action to Princeton, may I apply to another college’s early decision program?

No. If you apply Single-Choice Early Action to Princeton, you may not apply to another college’s early decision program.  

If I apply Single-Choice Early Action to Princeton, may I apply early to an honors program at a public university?

Yes. You may apply early to a public college or university, including to a public institution's honor's program, as long as the decision is not binding.

If I apply Single-Choice Early Action to Princeton, may I apply for rolling admission to another college or university?

Yes. You may do so as long as the decision is not binding.

If I apply Single Choice Early Action to Princeton, may I also apply to colleges outside of the United States?

Yes. You may apply to any international institution, as long as the decision is not binding.

Is there an advantage to applying Single-Choice Early Action?

All applicants to Princeton, whether they apply early action or regular decision, receive the same comprehensive, holistic review. Those who apply early gain no strategic advantage; the only advantage is one of convenience. If you know that Princeton is your first choice, then it may make sense for you to apply early.

Does Princeton offer Early Decision?

Princeton offers a single-choice early action program. It is a nonbinding program for students who have thoroughly researched  their college options and have decided that Princeton is their first choice. Students must complete their application by Nov. 1. They may not apply to an early program at any other private college or university, but they may apply early to any public institution, as long as the decision is nonbinding. Admission decisions will be made by mid-December. Admitted students will have until May 1 to respond and may choose to apply for regular decision at other institutions, enabling them to compare their admission and financial aid offers with those of other colleges and universities.

Are the application fees the same for the Common Application and the Universal College Application?

Yes, the fee to apply to Princeton University is $65 using either application. We also offer a variety of fee waiver options for students through either application.

How do I request a fee waiver?

To request a waiver, select the fee waiver option in the Common Application or the Universal College Application. Your college or guidance counselor must approve your fee waiver request online or submit your fee waiver form by mail or fax. In addition to the Common Application and Universal College Application fee waivers, Princeton also accepts the Princeton-specific, College Board, NACAC, or Realize Your College Potential fee waiver forms. Those participating in the QuestBridge program also may request a fee waiver.

Who is eligible for an application fee waiver?

You may request a fee waiver if you are applying for financial aid and the cost of applying to Princeton represents a financial hardship for your family. Please note that applying for a fee waiver will not disadvantage your application in any way.

Is it possible to get a receipt for the application fee?

If you paid the fee online, your e-mail confirmation is your receipt. If you paid by check, your cashed check (or image sent by your bank) is your receipt. We do not send any other acknowledgment of payment.

How do I pay the application fee?

You may pay for the Common Application or Universal College Application online with a credit card. If you are having trouble paying online, you may instead send a check or money order to the Princeton University Undergraduate Admission Office. Visit Contact Us for our mailing address.

May I use score choice?

Applicants are welcome to use the score choice option for standardized test score submission. Princeton will consider the highest individual section results across all sittings of the SAT Reasoning, plus Essay and the highest composite score for the ACT with Writing, as well as the two highest SAT Subject Test scores. We encourage applicants to submit all official test scores as soon as they are available.

If I have taken both the "new" and "old" SAT tests, should I submit both scores to you?

Yes. If you have taken both the new and old test, we recommend you submit both to us. We will super score within each test and evaluate you based on your highest score.

If I take the required tests more than once, which results does Princeton consider?

Princeton will consider the highest individual section results across all sittings of the SAT Reasoning With Essay and the highest composite score for the ACT with Writing, as well as the two highest SAT Subject Test scores.

Do I need a minimum required SAT, ACT, or Subject Test score?

No. There are no cutoffs. We consider all of these measures within the context of each applicant’s school and situation. Our most promising candidates tend to earn strong grades and have comparatively high scores on standardized tests. We also look at other parts of the application, including teacher references and essays, to learn more about what kind of student you are and how you approach learning.

What tests do I need to take?

A complete application includes official scores of the SAT Reasoning Test with Essay or ACT with Writing. We recommend, but do not require, that you take two SAT Subject Tests. Please note that the College Board English Language Proficiency Test does not count as a subject area test or as a substitute for the SAT Reasoning Test or ACT. We recommend, but do not require, that applicants who intend to pursue a B.S.E. degree take one SAT Subject Test in either physics or chemistry and one SAT Subject Test in mathematics (Level I or II).

What are the English Proficiency tests you accept?

We accept the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), the International English Language Testing System Academic (IELTS Academic) or the Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE Academic).

Who is required to submit an English Proficiency Test?

If English is not the primary language spoken in your home and you attend a school where English is not the language of instruction, you must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL), the International English Language Testing System Academic (IELTS Academic) or the Pearson Test of English Academic (PTE Academic), in addition to the SAT Reasoning (or ACT, with Writing, where offered). SAT Subject Tests are recommended but not required.

Will you combine the highest component scores from the old and new SAT?

No. We will consider the highest component scores from either the old or new test. The two tests are significantly different and therefore we will not combine scores from the two different tests. Likewise, we do not “superscore” the ACT across multiple sittings of the test.

May I use score choice?

Applicants are welcome to use the score choice option for standardized test score submission. Princeton will consider the highest individual section results across all sittings of the SAT Reasoning with Essay and the highest composite score for the ACT with Writing, as well as the two highest SAT Subject Test scores. We encourage applicants to submit all official test scores as soon as they are available.

Why do you require the writing/essay portion of the SAT and ACT?

Writing is an essential component of a Princeton education. Evidence-based reading and writing are critical tools in a college-level curriculum and the results of a writing exam are helpful in determining a student’s grasp of these concepts.

How do admission officers use standardized test results?

We use the scores along with your grades and teacher references to make an informed assessment of your academic strengths. No one is admitted or refused admission on the basis of scores alone. For the SAT Reasoning Test, we look at your highest score on each of the three sections (reading, writing and language, and mathematics), even if you earned them on three different test dates. We also require you to submit the essay score. For the ACT, we look at your highest composite score, plus Writing. For the SAT Subject Tests, we look at your two highest subjects. If you've taken the same subject test more than once, we look at your highest score.

What resources are available to learn more about the new SAT?

We encourage you to visit the College Board website to learn more about the redesign. In addition, the College Board offers free prep resources in partnership with Khan Academy.

If I have taken both the new and old test, should I submit both scores to you?

Yes. If you have taken both the new and old test, we recommend you submit both to us. We will super score within each test and evaluate you based on your highest score.

Will the new SAT be evaluated differently in the admission process?

No. Although the new and old SAT tests are different assessments, we will consult the concordance tables provided by the College Board to maintain continuity in our evaluation. The tables show the equivalent score on the old SAT for a score on the new SAT.

Will you super score across the old and new SAT?

No. We will consider the highest component scores from either the old or new test. The two tests are significantly different and therefore we will not combine scores from the two different tests. The College Board has provided concordance tables to compare between the new and old tests. Concordance tables comparing scores between the redesigned SAT and the ACT will be available as well.

Will Princeton require the optional essay on the new SAT?

Yes. The Optional Essay of the new SAT is required for our application.

When the redesigned SAT is available in March 2016, will you still allow students to submit the old SAT?

We will accept either version of the SAT, or the ACT with Writing. We do not have a preference for the “old” or “redesigned” SAT. The “old” SAT, or redesigned SAT with Essay and ACT with Writing are treated equally. View our redesigned SAT FAQ page.

If I take the required tests more than once, which results does Princeton consider?

Princeton will consider the highest individual section results across all sittings of the SAT with Writing and the highest composite score for the ACT with Writing, as well as the two highest SAT Subject Test scores.

Do I need a minimum required SAT, ACT, or Subject Test score?

No. There are no cutoffs. We consider all of these measures within the context of each applicant’s school and situation. Our most promising candidates tend to earn strong grades and have comparatively high scores on standardized tests. We also look at other parts of the application, including teacher references and essays, to learn more about what kind of student you are and how you approach learning.

What tests do I need to take?

A complete application includes official scores of the SAT Reasoning Test With Essay or ACT with Writing. We recommend, but do not require, that you take two SAT Subject Tests.Please note that the College Board English Language Proficiency Test does not count as a subject area test or as a substitute for the SAT Reasoning Test. We recommend, but do not require, that applicants who intend to pursue a B.S.E. degree take one SAT Subject Test in either physics or chemistry and one SAT Subject Test in mathematics (Level I or II).

The Common Application and the Universal College Application can be submitted online or as a paper copy. Which do you prefer?

Electronic submission of the Universal College Application and Common Application may be more convenient for many students. We know, however, that for some students submitting applications electronically is a hardship. We therefore give exactly the same treatment and consideration to applications, whether they are submitted electronically or by paper. In other words, there is no disadvantage to applying using the paper version of the Universal College Application or the Common Application.

May I appeal my admission decision or ask to have the decision explained?

We cannot reconsider applications or offer individual explanations for our decisions. Most of our applicants are well qualified for Princeton. Since the admission staff must select a first-year class from an abundance of highly able and accomplished candidates, and since all applicants are compared to the entire applicant pool, it is extremely difficult to explain why any one student is refused.

What is the wait list?

Since we don't know until after May 1 how many students will accept our offer of admission, we invite a number of our applicants to stay on our wait list in the event we have remaining spaces in the first-year class. The list is unranked; if spaces become available, we will review the entire group of candidates on the wait list.

May students who are admitted defer enrollment to another year?

Yes. Students who wish to take a year off from their studies may request to defer their enrollment for one year (and sometimes for an additional year). If you pursue this, you may not enroll full time in a degree program at another institution during the deferral period. In recent years the activities of students taking a year off have included work, community service, travel, military service, arts training and religious studies. We recommend students request a deferral only after they are admitted and before May 10.

Have my application materials been received?

You may use Princeton's Application Tracking System to verify whether we have received all your required application materials. You will receive a confirmation notice when we have received your application.  Your checklist will be rendered complete once all of the required supporting materials have been sent. If your application is incomplete, we will let you know which pieces are missing and you will be given the opportunity to submit them without penalty.

My grandfather attended Princeton. Does that mean I am a “legacy” applicant?

Though you are welcome to indicate on your application if another relative attended Princeton, you are considered a “legacy” applicant only if your mother, father, stepmother, or stepfather attended Princeton.  

Are my chances of admission enhanced if a relative has attended Princeton?

The application process is the same for all candidates. However, in recognition of the special bond that Princeton has with its alumni, it is considered a “plus factor” in our process if your mother, father, stepmother, or stepfather attended Princeton. We take that information into account as part of our holistic review process.  

Does it help to have extra letters of recommendation?

We believe that the required teacher and guidance counselor references give us much of the information we need to make thoughtful, well-informed decisions. Additional letters are only helpful if the person writing the recommendation knows the candidate well and can provide new, detailed information.

What letters of recommendations are required?

We require two academic teacher recommendations, and request, but do not require, a letter from your guidance counselor, college adviser or another school official to accompany the School Report.

Are on-campus interviews offered?

No. We offer interviews off-campus by the Princeton Alumni Schools Committee. If there are enough volunteers in your area, you will be contacted by an interviewer after you submit your application. If you do choose to visit campus you will have the opportunity to attend an admission information session, a campus tour or an engineering school tour.

Do I need to have an interview as part of the admission process?

We try to offer each applicant the opportunity to have a conversation with an alumnus/a volunteer. This is a chance for you to learn more about the Princeton experience, and for us to learn more about you. After you submit your application, a member of the Princeton Alumni Schools Committee in your area will contact you to arrange a convenient meeting time and place. We include the interviewer’s comments in our review of your application. Interviews aren't required as part of the admission process, but we encourage candidates to accept the invitation. Don't be concerned if interviews are not available in your area; we will give your application full consideration without an interview.

The questions on the Common Application and the Universal College Application are slightly different. Does that matter?

No. The essential elements we require are covered by both applications. Applicants are not at an advantage or disadvantage based on the application they choose.

Are the Common Application and the Universal College Application read differently by the admission office?

No. The Universal College Application and the Common Application are reviewed in the same way, using a holistic review process.

Are deadlines the same for both the Common Application and the Universal College Application?

Yes. The deadlines for both applications are Nov. 1 for single-choice early action and Jan. 1 for regular decision.

You accept either the Common Application or the Universal College Application. Is a student advantaged by using one application over the other?

We view the two applications as equivalent and treat them equally. Please feel free to submit whichever application you prefer.

How can I let the admission staff know about my special talent in athletics?

Talented student athletes interested in one of our varsity Division I programs should contact our coaches for more information about varsity athletics at Princeton. Coaches will advise the admission staff about applicants with exceptional athletic talents. Learn more. 

How can I let the admission staff know about my special talent in the arts?

Please send samples of your work in the arts to the admission office by Nov. 7; for early action and by Jan. 6 for regular decision, following the guidelines listed in Princeton's online Optional Arts Form. If you are unable to submit the online form, you may submit a paper Optional Arts Form. For a list of acceptable file formats and submission types, please visit the Optional Arts Form page. To the best of our ability, we’ll have arts faculty review your submissions and advise the admission staff regarding your abilities.

Do students apply to specific academic departments or schools?

We ask you to tell us on the application which degree program you may be most interested in following: A.B. (bachelor of arts), B.S.E. (bachelor of science in engineering) or undecided. We look closely at the math and science preparation of students considering engineering studies. However, students apply to the first-year class of Princeton University, not to the engineering or liberal arts programs, and are not locked into a degree program (or a specific department within that degree program) upon admission. Students in the engineering school choose a concentration (major) by the end of the first year; bachelor of arts students have two years to choose a concentration.

Are my chances of admission enhanced by submitting application materials before other applications?

No. Though we encourage regular decision applicants to submit their portion of the application by Dec. 15, if possible, there is no advantage to doing so.  

When are applications due?

Nov. 1 is our submission deadline for single-choice early action. Jan. 1 is our submission deadline for regular decision. We encourage regular decision applicants to submit their portion of the application by Dec. 15, if possible. View all important application dates and deadlines.

How and when should I begin my admission application?

You should begin reviewing Princeton's application requirements and materials after the spring of your junior year and plan on beginning your application in the summer before or during the fall of your senior year. The online Common Application and Princeton's writing supplement to the Common Application are available mid-August, as are the Universal College Application and the Princeton Supplement to the Universal College Application. Learn more about applying for admission.

Are senior year grades considered when evaluating applications?

Your counselor is asked to send us your first semester or first trimester grades with the Mid Year Report. It is important that you continue to excel in your classes during your final year of high school. If you are admitted, your counselor is asked to send us your final grades for the senior year with the Final Report. Admission is conditional upon your successful completion of the senior year. Princeton reserves the right to withdraw an offer of admission if there is a significant drop in your academic performance between January and June of your senior year.

Are the courses I take in my last year of high school important in the admission process?

Yes. You should maintain a full academic course load for your senior year of high school. You will need to ask your school to send us your grades for the first semester or trimester of your senior year, along with the Mid Year Report form. If you are admitted, we will ask for your final grades at the end of the school year.

To what extent are extracurricular activities considered in the application process?

In addition to academic qualifications, we are interested in the talents and interests you would bring to Princeton outside the classroom. We don't value one type of activity over another. Rather, we appreciate sustained commitment to the interests you have chosen to pursue. Some of the students we admit have one well-honed talent; others have participated in a range of activities. We take particular note of leadership and exceptional talents or accomplishments.

Do weighted grades or class rank matter in the evaluation of applicants?

In trying to get a sense of the strength of the academic program you have pursued in high school, we look at your transcript course by course and consider all the information your school provides about your academic performance. We also ask the school official completing your School Report to comment on the rigor of your academic program in the context of what is available at your school. Weighted grades or class rank can be another measure of the strength of your academic program as compared with other students who also have many As, but we give equal consideration to applicants from schools that don’t weight grades or rank.

How does Princeton measure academic promise?

We include many factors in our assessment, particularly a student’s secondary school program and record, as well as standardized test results, and teacher and counselor recommendations. All these components are taken into consideration when we evaluate a student’s high school performance. We value liveliness of mind, motivation, creativity, perseverance and independent thought. A prospective student’s intellectual curiosity and academic excellence are the most important factors in our decision.

Is different weight given to different parts of the application?

No. We do not have a formula for weighting different parts of the application. While the transcript is the most important part of an application, we consider all of the components of each application and consider each applicant’s particular strengths.

What does Princeton look for in its applicants?

We review each application individually to get a sense of that student’s particular combination of strengths. We don't have a profile of the ideal applicant or the ideal class. In fact, one of Princeton’s greatest strengths is the variety of talents, personal qualities, experiences and points of view in each incoming class. There are some qualities we hope all Princeton students share: integrity, a deep interest in learning and a devotion to both academic and non-academic pursuits. Many students also bring distinctive academic and extracurricular talents and achievements. Beyond those fundamental qualities, we consider how each candidate might contribute to the community we will bring together for that year’s class.

Will college-credit courses taken in high school transfer to Princeton?

Princeton does not offer credit toward degree requirements for college or university courses taken before you enroll. However, you can take SAT Subject Tests, AP exams or placement exams offered by some academic departments at Princeton to demonstrate your knowledge in a subject, which may permit you to skip the introductory-level course in that area. You can find detailed information about Princeton’s AP policy in our undergraduate course catalog.

How does Princeton regard college courses taken during high school?

Taking college courses while you are a high school student indicates to us that you seek out academic challenges, but we do not expect students to have taken college courses before they apply. Applicants who have taken college courses are most often at high schools not offering many advanced courses such as advanced placement or International Baccalaureate.

Does Princeton require particular high school courses?

We don't prescribe a particular high school curriculum, but we do have suggestions for a course of study that will provide solid preparation for a challenging undergraduate program. Students who intend to pursue the B.S.E. must complete a year of calculus and high school physics prior to enrolling at Princeton. Chemistry is also recommended. Learn more about academic preparation for study at Princeton.

Is there an advantage to taking honors, advanced, Advanced Placement (AP) or International Baccalaureate (IB) courses—even if it might be tougher to earn high grades?

Yes. We consider it a promising sign when students challenge themselves with advanced courses in high school. We understand that not all secondary schools offer the same range of advanced courses, but our strongest candidates have taken full advantage of the academic opportunities available to them in their high schools.

Does Princeton offer benefits for veterans?

Princeton University welcomes applications from veterans and dependents who are eligible for education benefits offered by the Department of Veterans Affairs, which include the Yellow Ribbon Program, and complies with the principles outlined in Executive Order 13607. Princeton participates fully in the Yellow Ribbon program without limitation on the number of students who are eligible. The executive order addresses key areas relating to federal military and veterans educational benefits programs.

Will my choice in course of study affect my chance for admission?

On the application we ask you to indicate the degree program (A.B., B.S.E. or undecided) and the departments that most interest you. These choices don't affect your chances for admission, nor do they commit you to a particular course of study. We look closely at the math and science background of students interested in the B.S.E. program, and we consider every applicant’s abilities across the academic subjects. Princeton engineering students choose a field of concentration (major) after one year and liberal-arts students after two years. More than 70 percent of our undergraduates are majoring in fields different from those they indicated when they applied.

Are there quotas for certain kinds of applicants?

No. The admission office does not use quotas of any kind.  

Does it make a difference to Princeton whether I attend a public or private school?

No. We consider how well you have used the resources available to you, regardless of where you attend school. A few students in each incoming class have been home schooled.

Does Princeton limit the number of students who can be admitted from a particular school?

No. We will look at your application individually, in comparison with the entire applicant pool, not only in comparison to applications from other students at your school.

May I apply for regular decision to Princeton if I have already been admitted to another college or university under a binding early decision plan?

No. When you apply to another college or university under a binding early decision plan, you have made a commitment to attend that college if admitted. We honor that commitment and do not consider applicants under those circumstances.

May high school juniors apply?

While we will consider applications from students who choose to leave high school early, they must be competitive with students who have completed rigorous, comprehensive course work through senior year. This option tends to be most realistic for students who have exhausted their high school’s academic offerings.

Does Princeton consider applicants who have been home schooled?

Yes. We receive and consider applications from home schooled students every year.  In fact, the valedictorian of the Princeton Class of ’02 was home schooled before entering Princeton.

Is it possible to transfer to Princeton from another college or university?

Princeton does not offer transfer admission at this time. Any student who has graduated from secondary school and enrolled as a full-time or part-time degree candidate at any college or university worldwide is considered a transfer applicant and is not eligible for undergraduate admission for fall 2017. Additionally, any student who has completed a post-secondary degree is not eligible for undergraduate admission or a second undergraduate degree from Princeton. We cannot make any exceptions to this policy.  Most other universities in the United States have a transfer program.  It is a decision each university makes for that university alone. Princeton plans to reinstate its transfer admission process in 2018, at the earliest. We will make a formal announcement about the new process once the program is put into place.

Can students begin studies at Princeton during the spring semester?

No. First-year students are admitted for the fall term only.

Are minimum gradepoint averages, class ranks, or test scores required for admission?

No. We consider all of these measures, but only within the context of each applicant’s school and situation. In general, our most promising candidates tend to earn high grades and have comparatively high scores on standardized tests. These criteria, while important, do not by themselves provide a complete picture of each student’s academic accomplishment or potential. We evaluate all aspects of a student’s academic preparation.

If you have a question that is not answered above or elsewhere on the site, you are welcome to contact us.
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Admission

Undergraduate Admission Office

P.O. Box 430
Princeton University
Princeton, NJ 08542-4030

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Princeton University
110 West College
Princeton, NJ 08544

Phone: 609-258-3060

Fax: 609-258-6743

Email: uaoffice@princeton.edu

Financial Aid

Undergraduate Financial Aid Office

P.O. Box 591
Princeton University
Princeton, NJ 08542-0591

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Princeton University
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Phone: 609-258-3330

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